Author Topic: Vindicating Columbus?  (Read 3056 times)

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Offline Phidippides

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Vindicating Columbus?
« on: October 26, 2010, 03:44:56 AM »
"Already long ago, from when we sold our vote to no man, the People have abdicated our duties; for the People who once upon a time handed out military command, high civil office, legions everything, now restrains itself and anxiously hopes for just two things: bread and circuses" ~Juvenal

Offline scout1067

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Re: Vindicating Columbus?
« Reply #1 on: October 26, 2010, 03:58:38 AM »
Dang that inconvenient research. ;D
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Offline Aetheling

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Re: Vindicating Columbus?
« Reply #2 on: December 03, 2010, 10:46:41 AM »
"It's not fair, we're unbalanced !"

« Last Edit: December 06, 2010, 09:21:54 AM by Aetheling »

Offline Jake10

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Re: Vindicating Columbus?
« Reply #3 on: December 03, 2010, 08:46:56 PM »
Well, when you consider who his crew were, it's a miracle Columbus even made it to the new world in one piece. If you give criminals in prison a chance at freedom at the cost of taking part in an experiment extremely likely to fail, only the ones who have nothing to lose will agree. Who knows where those guys had been.

Offline Aetheling

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Re: Vindicating Columbus?
« Reply #4 on: December 14, 2010, 12:03:30 AM »

Offline donroc

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Re: Vindicating Columbus?
« Reply #5 on: December 14, 2010, 08:06:42 AM »
In 17th century Spain it was known as mal frances, the French sickness.
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Offline Aetheling

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Re: Vindicating Columbus?
« Reply #6 on: December 14, 2010, 08:37:59 AM »
In 17th century Spain it was known as mal frances, the French sickness.

Oh, the French disease ?  8)

"...syphilis had been called the "French disease" in Italy, Poland and Germany, and the "Italian disease" in France. In addition, the Dutch called it the "Spanish disease", the Russians called it the "Polish disease", the Turks called it the "Christian disease" or "Frank disease" (frengi) and the Tahitians called it the "British disease". These "national" names are due to the disease often being spread by foreign sailors and soldiers during their frequent sexual contact with local prostitutes.
During the 16th century, it was called "great pox" in order to distinguish it from smallpox. In its early stages, the great pox produced a rash similar to smallpox (also known as variola). However, the name is misleading, as smallpox was a far more deadly disease. The terms "Lues" (or Lues venerea, Latin for "venereal plague") and "Cupid's disease" have also been used to refer to syphilis. In Scotland, syphilis was referred to as the Grandgore. The ulcers suffered by British soldiers in Portugal were termed "The Black Lion"..."
Code: [Select]
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1 : http://www.antiquusmorbus.com/English/EnglishB.htm

« Last Edit: December 14, 2010, 11:38:07 PM by Aetheling »

Offline Omer

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Re: Vindicating Columbus?
« Reply #7 on: December 15, 2010, 01:41:31 AM »
In 17th century Spain it was known as mal frances, the French sickness.

Oh, the French disease ?  8)

"...syphilis had been called the "French disease" in Italy, Poland and Germany, and the "Italian disease" in France. In addition, the Dutch called it the "Spanish disease", the Russians called it the "Polish disease", the Turks called it the "Christian disease" or "Frank disease" (frengi) and the Tahitians called it the "British disease". These "national" names are due to the disease often being spread by foreign sailors and soldiers during their frequent sexual contact with local prostitutes.
During the 16th century, it was called "great pox" in order to distinguish it from smallpox. In its early stages, the great pox produced a rash similar to smallpox (also known as variola). However, the name is misleading, as smallpox was a far more deadly disease. The terms "Lues" (or Lues venerea, Latin for "venereal plague") and "Cupid's disease" have also been used to refer to syphilis. In Scotland, syphilis was referred to as the Grandgore. The ulcers suffered by British soldiers in Portugal were termed "The Black Lion"..."
Code: [Select]
1
1 : http://www.antiquusmorbus.com/English/EnglishB.htm



When I read your link about Archaic Medical Terms, I feel like ... dizzy ! ;)
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Offline Aetheling

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Re: Vindicating Columbus?
« Reply #8 on: December 15, 2010, 08:05:55 AM »
When I read your link about Archaic Medical Terms, I feel like ... dizzy ! ;)

Call Dr. Schweitzer !  ;D